Wi-Fi security

Being Secure on Public Wi-Fi: VPN, Firewalls, File Sharing

Wi-Fi security is a very different thing at home and away.

Wi-Fi networks that you setup and control, be it at home or in a small business, start with an assumed safe group of users. The main security objectives, which I wrote about last time, are two-fold: encrypting data traveling over the air and keeping outsiders out.

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Free internet not worth it if not secure

TAKING your laptop on the road opens it up to all kinds of dangers if you regularly use untrusted internet access. But a few simple tips and tools can make all the difference.

Network security is a constant battle of precaution and vigilance. But somehow security processes often lapse when a portable computer leaves the office network. 

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Are Wi-Fi networks safe?

Wi-Fi networks are safe only if you use the security features properly.  If you don’t, someone nearby could access your wireless network, attack the PCs or other devices on your network and monitor your communications, stealing passwords for example.  Weak wireless network security contributed to the largest identity theft fraud ever, according to the U.S.
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What equipment do you need for a Wi-Fi network?

A Wi-Fi network starts with an Access Point, which is the broadcasting device you attach to the Internet through a cable or DSL modem.  The Access Point uses a type of radio signal to communicate with PCs or laptops equipped with compatible wireless network adapters.  The equipment is labeled with the standard it supports, listed here with newest and fastest first:  802.11n, 802.11g, 802.11b and 802.11a.  Devices are backward compatible, meaning newer ones will work with the older ones, just at a slower speed.
U.S.

What is Wi-Fi?

Wi-Fi is short for "wireless fidelity" and it uses radio waves to make a computer network without wires.  A Wi-Fi network at home or work is great because you can access your network from anywhere.  Be careful though—you need to carefully set up security for your wireless network to keep others from accessing it.  (See, How do I make my home or small business Wi-Fi network safe?)
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What else should I do for Wi-Fi network security?

Here are more tips to ensure your Wi-Fi network is safe.  

Change the default name of your wireless network (called the SSID)

Change the default username and password to login to your wireless Access Point; if you don’t, someone else might login and change your security setting.

Do not let the Access Point broadcast the name of your wireless network (SSID).  
International

What equipment do you need for a Wi-Fi network?

A Wi-Fi network starts with an Access Point, which is the broadcasting device you attach to the Internet through a cable or DSL modem.  The Access Point uses a type of radio signal to communicate with PCs or laptops equipped with compatible wireless network adapters.  The equipment is labeled with the standard it supports, listed here with newest and fastest first:  802.11n, 802.11g, 802.11b and 802.11a.  Devices are backward compatible, meaning newer ones will work with the older ones, just at a slower speed.
International

What is Wi-Fi?

Wi-Fi is short for "wireless fidelity" and it uses radio waves to make a computer network without wires.  A Wi-Fi network at home or work is great because you can access your network from anywhere.  Be careful though—you need to carefully set up security for your wireless network to keep others from accessing it.  (See, How do I make my home or small business Wi-Fi network safe?)
International

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