windows password

What do I do if my identity is stolen or my personal or financial information has been compromised?

Having your identity stolen can be a very frightening experience and can leave you with many questions on what you can do to limit the damage. Luckily, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) offers some advice on how to protect yourself:

1. Place a fraud alert on your credit reports, and review your reports Placing a fraud alert on your credit report can help prevent the thief from opening any more accounts under your name.

U.S.

How can I limit my child’s game time in Microsoft Windows?

Parental Controls, or Family Settings as it is called in Windows 8, are available to set specific time limits on when children are allowed to log on to the computer. You can set which hours the kids are allowed to log on for each day of the week. When their allotted time is up, they'll be automatically logged off.

Here’s how to get started: Open system preferences and click to open Parental Controls. There will be a prompt to enter an administrator password or confirmation, then type the password or provide confirmation.

U.S.

How can I keep my passwords safe?

Passwords are used very widely for authentication to Web and other IT services/networks. The only problem is that if someone gets hold of your password then they can easily use it to "borrow" your identity. It is therefore important to avoid passwords that are too simple such as birthdays, place of birth, children's birth dates, nicknames etc. The best way to do this is to write them down somewhere safe but don't write down what the associated Web site is.
U.S.

How can I keep my passwords safe?

Passwords are used very widely for authentication to Web and other IT services/networks. The only problem is that if someone gets hold of your password then they can easily use it to "borrow" your identity. It is therefore important to avoid passwords that are too simple such as birthdays, place of birth, children's birth dates, nicknames etc. The best way to do this is to write them down somewhere safe but don't write down what the associated Web site is.
International

Obama’s BlackBerry a Digital Security Symptom

President-elect Barack Obama is addicted to his BlackBerry. Like many Americans who are glued to their wireless PDA for the latest snippet of news or information he doesn't want to give it up. Despite urging from White House lawyers and the Secret Service, in a recent interview with CNBC he said, "I'm still clinging to my BlackBerry...they're going to pry it out of my hands."
U.S.

How do I choose a good password?

You could argue a “good password” is an oxymoron, because any password that is stolen can be used at will by the thief.  But another risk is that if the password is too easy someone could guess it or use a password breaker program to find it.  Passwords should never be family names or numbers that are easily found out like a birthday, address or phone.  They should also not be words, which are vulnerable to what’s called a “dictionary” attack.  Use a mix of at least eight letters and numbers, changing cases and using symbols ($!* etc.) if allowed.
U.S.

How do I choose a good password?

You could argue a “good password” is an oxymoron, because any password that is stolen can be used at will by the thief.  But another risk is that if the password is too easy someone could guess it or use a password breaker program to find it.  Passwords should never be family names or numbers that are easily found out like a birthday, address or phone.  They should also not be words, which are vulnerable to what’s called a “dictionary” attack.  Use a mix of at least eight letters and numbers, changing cases and using symbols ($!* etc.) if allowed.
International

Are you practicing safe password practices?

To make your passwords as strong as possible, don't use birthdays, addresses or phone numbers for example.  And change them regularly.  A strong password should be difficult (or impossible if you do a good enough job) for others to guess, and include eight or more letters and numbers.  To stay safe, don’t input your bank account details or confidential passwords on a shared computer at work.  Your PC will offer to remember your password, but think carefully about accepting that for important passwords like bank accounts.  If your PC remembers your password, anyone else who has access to
International

Are you practicing safe password practices?

To make your passwords as strong as possible, don't use birthdays, addresses or phone numbers for example.  And change them regularly.  A strong password should be difficult (or impossible if you do a good enough job) for others to guess, and include eight or more letters and numbers.  To stay safe, don’t input your bank account details or confidential passwords on a shared computer at work.  Your PC will offer to remember your password, but think carefully about accepting that for important passwords like bank accounts.  If your PC remembers your password, anyone else who has access to
U.S.

Are passwords safe?

Passwords are not safe because if someone steals it they can access your online account.  Imagine you could withdraw money at an ATM by just entering a PIN code.  No ATM card required.  Would you trust that?  That would mean that if someone could get your PIN code, say by filming you at a grocery store checkout, they could clean out your checking account. But that is exactly what we have protecting most desktops and network access today—reliance only on passwords to identify you.
International
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