security

Credit card breaches: are consumers out of luck?

Cyber security attacks that compromised the credit card information of hundreds of millions of customers at major retailers like Target over the holiday season drew vast national media attention. But "there's actually been a number of breaches over the years," Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray told CBS News; "your information is always at risk, every day."

U.S.

American credit cards improving security with EMV at last

The 70 million Target credit card breach might be the first time most people ever heard of EMV, if they even noted its mention in the coverage. More secure cards wouldn’t have averted the breach but they would have limited the value of the stored data. News stories have drawn attention to the fact that American credit cards lag behind Europe and Canada when it comes to security.

U.S.

Back to School Mobile Phone and Computer Safety Tips

Before you know it, students will be headed back to colleges and universities all over the country. Here are a dozen tips to help students stay cyber-secure.

Having a personal computer is no longer a luxury for college students—it's become a necessity. Most students choose laptops, so they can take notes in class or study outside under the trees. And most of those laptops aren't protected nearly as well as they should be.

U.S.

Cybercrime: main targets in 2013

Cybercrime, “When the hunter learns to shoot without missing, the bird learns to fly without perching.”

This is an age-old adage that rightly depicts this ever evolving breed of criminals. These cybercriminals are each year devising fresh and sophisticated ways of developing threats that target distinct organizations, individuals and computer system. This year, 2013, is no different only that they have advanced in complexity and maliciousness at a very alarming rate.

This article shall delve into the top most predictions to cyber attacks.

U.S.

Google reveals the 10 Worst Password Ideas

Man’s best friend does a terrific job of protecting your home. But when it comes to protecting your online accounts, your beloved pet is literally the worst choice possible.

 

Recently, Google conducted a study of 2,000 people to learn more about their methods for choosing account passwords. The research revealed a worrying fact: Most people choose passwords based on readily available information. This means a surprising number of accounts can be hacked using a few simple, educated guesses.

So, what are the most common passwords?

U.S.
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