phishing

Twitter Password Resets Linked to Torrent Sites

Twitter has explained in greater detail the reason behind its decision to reset the passwords for some of its users on Tuesday after an external phishing attack. It turns out the problem, which Twitter first described as a "combination of multiple bad acts," was part of a scam that may have exposed Twitter users who also visit torrent sites requiring login credentials. The incident also highlights, once again, that developing good password management habits is a crucial part of keeping your online identity secure.
International

Twitter Password Resets Linked to Torrent Sites

Twitter has explained in greater detail the reason behind its decision to reset the passwords for some of its users on Tuesday after an external phishing attack. It turns out the problem, which Twitter first described as a "combination of multiple bad acts," was part of a scam that may have exposed Twitter users who also visit torrent sites requiring login credentials. The incident also highlights, once again, that developing good password management habits is a crucial part of keeping your online identity secure.
U.S.

Hosting services under attack

A new phishing attack is targeting webmasters in an attempt to gain access to site credentials.

According to security firm Trusteer, the attack targets cPanel, a popular management tool for web hosts.

The attackers have sent out emails claiming to originate from the hosting firms.

The emails tell the user that due to maintenance activities all FTP credentials must be updated. The message contains a link to a phishing site which asks for log-in information.

International

How many people fall victim to phishing attacks?

According to a recently released report, based on a sample of 3 million users collected over a period of 3 months, approximately 45% of the time, users submitted their login information to the phishing site they visited.

The study, exclusively monitored users who successfully reached a live phishing site that was not blocked by their browser's built-in anti-phishing protection or filtered as fraudulent one (Phishing experiment sneaks through all anti-spam filters), and found out that on average, 12.5 out of one million customers sampled for a particular bank, visited the phishing site.

International

How many people fall victim to phishing attacks?

According to a recently released report, based on a sample of 3 million users collected over a period of 3 months, approximately 45% of the time, users submitted their login information to the phishing site they visited. The study, exclusively monitored users who successfully reached a live phishing site that was not blocked by their browser’s built-in anti-phishing protection or filtered as fraudulent one (Phishing experiment sneaks through all anti-spam filters), and found out that on average, 12.5 out of one million customers sampled for a particular bank, visited the phishing site.
U.S.

What do I do if I think I have been phished?

If you think or know you have been phished, report the phishing email to the proper authority. For example, if it's a credit card phishing email, report the email to the issuing bank. If you have given your banking or credit card information, immediately close the account and open a new one. In the future, be suspicious of all unsolicited or unexpected emails you receive, even if they appear to come from a trusted source. Your bank will never ask you to confirm any of your personal information by clicking a link to visit a Web site.

International

What is the best way to prevent phishing?

There are some basic things to remember to avoid being phished. First, never respond to any emails or instant messages that ask you for personal information or financial details. Second, if an email asks you to call a number to verify financial information, do not. Instead, use the phone number on the back of your credit card, or your bank's phone number. Third, always use anti-virus and anti-spyware software.

The best way to prevent phishing is to have some kind of personal security device separate from your PC that is part of the login.

International

Scareware goes Green

Malicious pseudo-environmentalists have come up with a new social engineering tactic aiming to improve the profit margins of their fake antivirus software releases - by promising to donate $2 from every purchase for saving the Amazonian green forests.

The new scareware template branded as "Green-AV Premier Edition 3.0" is pitched as the "World's First Antivirus Which Cares About the Environment" and goes for a hefty price of $99.99, in comparison to other scareware brands whose price tags vary from $49 to $79.

U.S.

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