Identity theft protection

Does my SIM card have a serial number? Is it the same as IMEI?

Yes, your SIM card has a serial number and it is different from your IMEI. You can normally find your SIM serial number (SSN) on the side of the card. The SSN typically has 19 digits and contains specific details about your operator, your location, and when it was made. The SSN is sometimes called the ICC-ID (Integrated Circuit Card ID).

See: What's my SIM card serial number for?

International

What is pharming and how should I protect myself?

Pharming is a Web attack where criminals are interested in obtaining your username and password from an e-commerce site or bank. Pharming can occur when you click a valid and correct link to a Web site or even when you have typed the URL of the Web site yourself. In a pharming attack, the criminal “hijacks” the intended site’s DNS (domain name system) server. The DNS is what points a certain address to a certain page. The result is that you are redirected to an imposter site that looks like your intended site.
International

What is pharming and how should I protect myself?

Pharming is a Web attack where criminals are interested in obtaining your username and password from an e-commerce site or bank. Pharming can occur when you click a valid and correct link to a Web site or even when you have typed the URL of the Web site yourself. In a pharming attack, the criminal “hijacks” the intended site’s DNS (domain name system) server. The DNS is what points a certain address to a certain page. The result is that you are redirected to an imposter site that looks like your intended site.
U.S.

Does the iPad make it easier for me to securely manage my personal data?

The iPad runs on the same operating system as the iPhone and uses Wi-Fi or 3G mobile data connections to browse the Internet, load and stream media, and install software. Therefore, security-wise, the iPad is the same as the iPhone. The iPad does make it easier to manage your personal data because it has a large screen that allows you to view whole Web pages, have a larger view of your e-mail, view photos and videos, organize your calendar and contacts, and a lot more.
U.S.

What do I do if I think I have been phished?

If you think or know you have been phished, report the phishing email to the proper authority. For example, if it's a credit card phishing email, report the email to the issuing bank. If you have given your banking or credit card information, immediately close the account and open a new one. In the future, be suspicious of all unsolicited or unexpected emails you receive, even if they appear to come from a trusted source. Your bank will never ask you to confirm any of your personal information by clicking a link to visit a Web site.

International

What do I do if I think my identity information was lost or stolen, but I am not sure it has been used?

You can contact your credit bureau and report the theft; they can set up an alert that will detect activity. If you believe your credit card or bank information has been compromised, contact the issuer or bank and cancel the account. Also remember to continually monitor your credit report and banking statements for any unusual activity. CIFAS, the UK's Fraud Prevention Service, has many useful links for people who have been the victim of identity theft on its Web site. See, How can I prevent identity theft?
International

What are common ways identity theft occurs?

Identity theft is not just about high tech crimes like phishing, malware and skimming. It is also about dumpster diving (looking in your trash) and old-fashioned theft (wallets). With a discarded bank statement thieves can change your billing address and phone number to their own. There are many other "cons" to which you should be alert. For example, you can be "phished" by mail if you receive a letter that looks like it's from your bank warning of identity risks and asks you to call the number provided. In this case, you'll be calling the thief's number!
International

What is identity theft?

Identity theft is a crime in which someone uses your identity information to commit fraud in your name. It takes many forms, obtaining a credit card, stealing your accounts, even getting a mortgage in your name. In the United Kingdom, fraud experts estimate 100,000 people, or about 0.17% of the population, fell victim last year to account hijacking, new-account fraud or other types of identity theft. In the United States, a Federal Trade Commission survey found 10 million ID-theft victims a year -- or 3.39% of the population.
International

Financial Crisis Fuels Identity Theft

Most Americans believe the world financial crisis has increased their risk of identity theft or related crimes, according to the latest Unisys Security Index.

The biannual survey of consumers in nine countries found that more than two-thirds of Americans are "extremely or very concerned" about other people obtaining and using their credit or debit card details -- with 90 percent at least "somewhat concerned."

U.S.

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