Identity theft protection

Are any countries using NFC-capable mobile devices for identity applications?

Some government initiatives are looking at putting identity information within the secure element (SE) of NFC-capable devices. Because the SE is so trusted, it is very feasible to store driver’s licenses, government and healthcare identity cards right within the mobile device.

U.S.

How can I prevent identity theft?

Here are some great ideas to help prevent identity theft.

1. Educate yourself about how identity theft happens. Remember you are the most important part of your identity and personal information security.

2. Protect your personal information. Shred financial documents and paperwork with personal information; don’t just throw them in the trash.

3. Don’t make your wallet a one-stop-stealing opportunity. Don’t keep social security numbers, birthdays and other personal information in your wallet.

U.S.

What do I do if I think I have been phished?

If you believe you’ve received a phishing email, do not respond, download any attachments, or click any links within the email. You can file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) online or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters consumer complaints into the Consumer Sentinel Network, a secure online database and investigative tool used by hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.

U.S.

What do I do if I think my identity information was lost or stolen, but I am not sure it has been used?

Having your identity information stolen can be a very frightening experience. Luckily PCWorld offers a few tips to limit the potential for damage caused by lost or stolen identity:

1. Change your passwords

U.S.

Should I be as concerned about fraud on the telephone as I am with online fraud?

Fraud of all types is a widespread problem that requires constant vigilance. A January 2012 survey by the UK’s National Fraud Authority found that 9.4% of adults had been a victim of identity theft fraud in the previous 12 months. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission estimates that 9% of fraudulent offers come through the telephone and 29% of fraudulent product purchases are made by phone.

U.S.

Should I be as concerned about fraud on the telephone as I am with online fraud?

Fraud of all types is a widespread problem that requires constant vigilance. A January 2012 survey by the UK’s National Fraud Authority found that 9.4% of adults had been a victim of identity theft fraud in the previous 12 months. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission estimates that 9% of fraudulent offers come through the telephone and 29% of fraudulent product purchases are made by phone.

International

Do cloud providers offer identity verification?

Because you trust a cloud provider with your personal and/or corporate information, it is important that they verify your identity each time you log in. The best kind of identity verification tool is some sort of two-factor authentication device. Two-factor authentication is “something you know,” like your username, and “something you have.”

U.S.

Simple Steps for Reducing Your Chances of Identity Fraud

New research show that last year it took victims less time to discover they’d been hit by identify fraud. But that’s nothing to celebrate. Those who monitored their accounts online noticed the fraud in less than two weeks. In contrast, other victims were unaware that anything was amiss for months. Simple, yet overlooked, steps can greatly reduce the likelihood you, or someone you love, will be a victim of identity fraud.
U.S.

Michelle Singletary: Watch out for social media scams

Your social media account on Twitter or Facebook may have connected you to a forgotten classmate or sweetheart, but it can also lead you straight into the hands of a predator.

All this Internet openness has made it much easier for people to be preyed upon by con artists who specialize in affinity fraud, using someone’s connection to certain groups to gain their trust and ultimately their life savings.
U.S.

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