password security

New MobileMe phishing scam attempts to relieve users of login data

While most treat the holidays as a time for goodwill toward all, scammers don’t really seem to have gotten the message. Their latest tactic: a phishing scheme aimed at MobileMe users.

First reported by The Mac Observer, the scam consists of a faked email, ostensibly from Apple’s MobileMe team. It warns that a virus has been found within the user’s iDisk; to keep the virus from spreading, users are instructed to reply to the email with their user name and password.
U.S.

How to prevent identity theft

Reports of declines in identity-theft incidents from such security research firms as Javelin Strategy & Research and government agencies, such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC's consumer-complaint statistics for 2010--pdf), must be taken with a grain of salt.  According to Javelin, the average out-of-pocket expense for consumer victims of identity theft increased from $387 per incident in 2009 to $631 in 2010, as Michelle Singletary reported last February in the Washington Post's Color of Money blog.
U.S.

Are Web apps the same as cloud apps?

Web apps and cloud apps refer to the same thing, an application accessed remotely. A good example is Google docs, which includes online Web apps for word processing, spreadsheets and presentations. To use these programs, all you need is a Web browser on your computer and access to the Internet. The applications themselves as well as the data you create are stored remotely on computers owned by Google. This contrasts with installing Microsoft Office on your own PC, and then using your own computer to run Word, Excel and PowerPoint and store your files locally.
U.S.

Are Web apps the same as cloud apps?

Web apps and cloud apps refer to the same thing, an application accessed remotely. A good example is Google docs, which includes online Web apps for word processing, spreadsheets and presentations. To use these programs, all you need is a Web browser on your computer and access to the Internet. The applications themselves as well as the data you create are stored remotely on computers owned by Google. This contrasts with installing Microsoft Office on your own PC, and then using your own computer to run Word, Excel and PowerPoint and store your files locally.
International

What’s done to protect access to my information in the “cloud”?

Most cloud computing applications rely on usernames and passwords to protect access to your information, just like most services you use on the Internet. Unfortunately, passwords provide a low level of security because they can be stolen by malware, malicious software programs like keystroke loggers that capture your login credentials as you type them and send them to hackers who can then access your information.

U.S.

What’s done to protect access to my information in the “cloud”?

Most cloud computing applications rely on usernames and passwords to protect access to your information, just like most services you use on the Internet. Unfortunately, passwords provide a low level of security because they can be stolen by malware, malicious software programs like keystroke loggers that capture your login credentials as you type them and send them to hackers who can then access your information.

International

Am I using cloud computing when shopping online at Amazon? Or, using Facebook?

Facebook is one of the more popular cloud computing activities; shopping online at Amazon.com is not cloud computing. What’s the difference? You are using cloud computing anytime you use programs or store files from someone else’s computer instead of your own. In the case of Facebook, it’s like they are giving you, and all of your friends, a personal website homepage, blog and photo archive to share. Another example is Google docs, a free online word processor that you access with a Web browser, but there is no software to purchase, such as Microsoft Word.
International

Am I using cloud computing when shopping online at Amazon? Or, using Facebook?

Facebook is one of the more popular cloud computing activities; shopping online at Amazon.com is not cloud computing. What’s the difference? You are using cloud computing anytime you use programs or store files from someone else’s computer instead of your own. In the case of Facebook, it’s like they are giving you, and all of your friends, a personal website homepage, blog and photo archive to share. Another example is Google docs, a free online word processor that you access with a Web browser, but there is no software to purchase, such as Microsoft Word.
U.S.

What is cloud computing?

Cloud computing is using a Web browser and the Internet to access applications (like word processing, a spreadsheet, email), store your data (files, emails, pictures) or use computer resources (Web hosting, blogging, creating a YouTube channel) on someone else’s computers instead of yours.

U.S.

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