chip card

Um chip de celular “vestível” deixaria você usar seu plano de dados em qualquer dispositivo

A operadora japonesa Docomo anunciou um conceito interessante que poderia mudar a maneira como usamos celulares e tablets: um dispositivo vestível no seu pulso leva o chip SIM e age como um dispositivo de autenticação para todo tipo de hardware.

Brazil

Will a U.S. contactless credit card work with a smart card reader in France or elsewhere on something that does not accept magnetic stripe cards, such as a gas pump?

Unfortunately, your U.S. contactless credit card does not use the same technology as the EMV chip cards used in France and the 80 other countries that have migrated to EMV. Therefore, you would not be able to use your contactless card to pay internationally at terminals that only accept EMV chip cards.

U.S.

Why America's Swipe-based Credit Cards are Outdated, Can Expose You to Fraud

With groundbreaking companies like Apple and Intel calling Silicon Valley home, this little piece of real estate on the western coast of the USA is virtually America's mother of invention, providing us with an impression that this country is ahead of the technology game. However, that perception is often quickly shattered once we leave our shores for Europe and try to pay for something with an American-issued credit card. Rejected. Why?
U.S.

Identity Theft Bust Exposes Need For 'Smart' Credit Cards

Experts say the United States is far behind Europe in adopting smart cards, which require cardholders to enter a personal identification number on a keypad, similar to a debit card transaction. Smart cards deter fraud because they contain computer chips that encrypt transaction information and require thieves to not only steal card data but also know the cardholder’s PIN, experts say.
U.S.

Chips: Bad for Your Waistline But Good for Your Wallet?

Chips may not be good for your waistline, but the financial industry thinks they'll be good for your wallet. Credit card fraud has been a well-publicized phenomenon for awhile now, but credit card issuers are chipping away at the problem. In fact, a chip may end much of the problem.Visa announced recently that they're more aggressively making the push to offer credit cards that use a computer chip embedded into the plastic, something known as EMV chips (the EMV stands for Europay, MasterCard and Visa). This is a change from what we use in the United States currently--a magnetic strip.
U.S.

Chips: Bad for Your Waistline But Good for Your Wallet?

Chips may not be good for your waistline, but the financial industry thinks they'll be good for your wallet. Credit card fraud has been a well-publicized phenomenon for awhile now, but credit card issuers are chipping away at the problem. In fact, a chip may end much of the problem.Visa announced recently that they're more aggressively making the push to offer credit cards that use a computer chip embedded into the plastic, something known as EMV chips (the EMV stands for Europay, MasterCard and Visa). This is a change from what we use in the United States currently--a magnetic strip.
International

POS Terminals For Chip-based Credit Cards Come to America, Visa Plans

If you've traveled to Europe in the past ten years and encountered problems when you tried to use a credit card with a magnetic strip on the back, you're not alone. But Visa wants to make sure that never happens again by pushing the adoption of a universal AND more secure credit card technology in the United States.
U.S.

POS Terminals For Chip-based Credit Cards Come to America, Visa Plans

If you've traveled to Europe in the past ten years and encountered problems when you tried to use a credit card with a magnetic strip on the back, you're not alone. But Visa wants to make sure that never happens again by pushing the adoption of a universal AND more secure credit card technology in the United States.
International

Thermal imaging can be used to steal PIN numbers

Researchers at the University of California have found that thermal imaging cameras are incredibly helpful for stealing PIN numbers when people take money out at cash machines. Residual heat from a person's finger when they touch the numbers on the keypad can be viewed by an infrared camera to reveal their PIN, without the need to see the finger perform press the individual keys.
U.S.

Thermal imaging can be used to steal PIN numbers

Researchers at the University of California have found that thermal imaging cameras are incredibly helpful for stealing PIN numbers when people take money out at cash machines. Residual heat from a person's finger when they touch the numbers on the keypad can be viewed by an infrared camera to reveal their PIN, without the need to see the finger perform press the individual keys.
International

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